Every Breath You Take – 5 Ways to Keep Calm

You’ve heard the advice, “take a deep breath” during times of anxiety, uncertainty and stress. Active breathing techniques have been used over the centuries to calm the nervous sytem (activating the parasympathetic system) and reduce our heart rate. The beauty of breathing is that these subtle exercises become more effective with repetition and practice so they are better than tranquilizers (which lose efficacy over time!)

Research has shown the effectiveness of deep breathing techniques on reducing physiological and psychological stress as well as blood pressure. Also, did you know that there is a direct link between nasal breathing and cognitive functions? This study found the impact that deep breathing has on modulating cognitive processing and behavior.

So, in this blog, I’ll share some breathing tips (also called pranayama or “breath control”) to help you stay mentally fit, keep calm and carry on (which we all need nowadays).

Equal Breathing (Sama Vritti)

This easy breathing technique can be done anywhere and is great at bedtime to guide you into sleep.

  • Inhale and exhale through your nose for a count of 4
  • If you can go longer, try 6-8 counts per breath

Abdominal Breathing

Try this when faced with a stressful situation:

  • Put one hand on your chest and the other on your belly and take a deep breath through your nose (as long as you can) and exhale slowly through your mouth. Try for about 10 minutes to get yourself into a calming parasympathetic state.

Alternate Nostril Breathing (Nadi Shodhana)

This alternate breathing is said to unite the right and left sides of the brain to bring balance, calm and focus, so it’s best done during the daytime.

  • Hold your right thumb over your right nostril and breathe in deeply through your left nostril. Close off your left nostril with your index finger at the peak of inhalation. Repeat the same pattern of breathing in with your right and exhaling with your left nostril.

Stimulating Breath (Bellows Breath)

As the name implies, it is used to increase alertness and energy and you should feel this on your diaphragm, chest and abdomen. 

With your mouth closed, inhale and exhale rapidly (3 in-and-out breaths per second) through your nose. Try this for 5-10 seconds then breathe normally. Repeat until you can do this for up to a minute. Watch this video for a tutorial:

https://www.drweil.com/videos-features/videos/the-stimulating-breath/

The 4-7-8 (or Relaxing Breath) Exercise

This is like a tranquilizer for your nervous system and can be done anywhere without getting weird stares from people around you.

  • Start by placing the tip of your tongue right behind your upper front teeth
  • Exhale through the mouth, making the exhaling sound
  • Close your mouth and inhale through your nose for 4 counts
  • Hold your breath for 7 counts
  • Exhale throught your mouth for 8 counts making the exhaling sound
  • Repeat the cycle 3 more times for a total of 4 breaths
  • Watch this tutorial to do the 4-7-8 Breathing Technique: https://www.drweil.com/videos-features/videos/breathing-exercises-4-7-8-breath/

Breathing App

If you do better with a visual, download this FREE Breathing App – it offers six rhythms of inhales/exhales (2:3 to 5:7) and shows a ball with a calming sound that inflates and deflates to the rhythm.

Natural Detox Strategies

Did you know that there are over 15,000 man-made chemicals that are in our environment that our body doesn’t know what to do with? As humans, we have not evolved enough to deal with the bombardment of these toxins from the air, water, ground and the atmostphere. We know that toxins are harmful to our biological function so what to do? Thankfully, there are a number of ways to mitigate the risks even though we may not be able to eliminate them completely. So, in this blog, I’ll share some tips on ways to keep your body optimal so it can repair and detox itself.

Clean Air

You need to note what is going into your body that is contributing to your toxin load. One of the most important is the air you breathe. Did you know that air pollution was linked to a higher risk of dying from COVID-19 in the US? If you’re a city dweller, it’s especially important to prioritize clean air in your living space. You may want to invest in an air filter for the areas where you spend most of your time – at least get one for your bedroom so you have clean air to breathe while you sleep. There are plenty of good air filters to choose from in many price ranges. Here are several to consider:

Clean Water

Even if you get tested city water where you live, the drinking water can be contaminated with disease-carrying organisms and toxins leaking into your water source from run-offs from industrial plants, factory farms and even fracking. You can search for the quality of your water in the EWG’s tap water database. Put in your zip code and it will show you which chemicals are above acceptable levels. You can also request a report from your water source on the quality of the tap – keep in mind that only certain contaminants are tested so you won’t actually know what’s in there. So, if you’re not up to solving a mystery, how about opting for a whole house filtration system if the quality of your water source is not up to par? If you cannot afford a whole house filter, invest in a reverse osmosis filter system to put under your sink for drinking/cooking and a shower filter to minimize contact with your skin. Here’s what I use:

Sweat

When you sweat, your skin’s pores open up to eliminate toxins including heavy metals and foreign chemical substances. As your body’s largest organ, the skin can flush wastes out through sweat thereby putting less burden on other organs like the liver, intestines and kidneys. So get a good workout and work up a good sweat. If you are like me and don’t sweat easily (nor want to do a lot of strenuous exercise to get there), you may want to look into a sauna. I like infrared saunas as they don’t require any special hook-up in your home. The infrared saunas use electric and infrared light to create heat waves which are absorbed by your skin. They only go up to about 150 degrees but they do a great job of penetrating through your skin to get you sweating like a pig in no time!

There are many infrared saunas out in the market today – they used to be very expensive but now they have ones for every budget. Alternatively, if you don’t want to spend a lot of money, try one of the sauna blankets – this one got top ratings on Amazon.

Here’s the one I have at home – it’s an investment but it will last at least a decade with proper use.

Clean Food

Eat Organic – Organic food has more nutrients and are rich with natural antioxidants and disease fighting chemicals. If you have your own garden, you are well on your way to feeding your body with optimal nutrtion. If you cannot afford all organic, how about avoiding these dirty dozen that are the most pesticide laden?

Avoid GMOs – Many grains, grain by-products and produce are genetically modified, so always look for the “Non-GMO” label when purchasing. Here are the most prevalent genetically modified products: Soy, Corn, Canola Oil, Mik, Sugar, Zucchini, Yello Squash, Papaya

Grass-Fed or Wild Meat – Grass-fed and wild-caught meat get their diet from natural sources (not corn and other foods that these animals are not meant to eat) and as a result, have a favorable profile of nutrients and essential fatty acids. Same goes for fish – opt for fish choices like wild salmon to minimize contamination over farmed salmon.

Natural Sweeteners – Did you know that artificial sweeteners like aspartame can disrupt the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar and actually promote obesity by altering the function of the bacteria that’s in your gut?  With most people trying to lose weight rather than gain, this sounds like a bad idea. But you don’t have to give up the sweets – just stick to natural sweeteners like stevia, monk fruit, allulose and erythritol. They even make tasty sodas from these sweeneters. Here’s the one I drink when I’m craving soda.

Minimize Gluten – Gluten has been linked to intestinal and neurological disorders but it’s in almost everything we eat – bread, pizza, bagels, baked products. Wheat flour being grown today has been hybridized to maximize gluten content to satisfy western tastebuds. Steer clear of gluten if possible – if you are eating out/traveling and find it impossible to avoid, take some digestive enzymes with your meal. Here’s one to have handy.

Artificial Colors and Additives – Did you know that according to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), there are more than 10,000 additivies that are allowed in food? It’s mind boggling what you need to know to avoid as these additives are linked to chronic health issues.  For example, studies have shown a correlation between consumption of artificial food coloring and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children. There has been controversy on the safety of these artificial colors so it’s best to avoid them even if they are considered ‘safe’. The most common ones to look for are Blue No. 1, Yellow No. 5, and Yellow No. 6.

Here’s the dirty dozen of food additives you want to steer clear of.

Sleep

Your body powers down at night so it can get to work on cleaning up all the waste that’s been accumulated in your body and brain throughout the day. So, make sure you are getting adequate and proper shut-eye.

Minimize EMF

Were you aware that EMF radiation can negatively impact sleep quality as it reduces the amount of melatonin your body produces at night? So keep that cell phone powered down and away from your bedroom. If you need a device (iPad) to wind down at night like me, download the podcasts and episodes and watch them on airplane mode. I’ve got to have my nightly podcast but with the app, it’s easy to download all the sleepy material to put me under. 

Avoid Plastics

Plastics are not only littering our oceans and harming sea life, they’re harmful to our health, too. A commonly-used plastic additive called Bisphenol A is a known endocrine disruptor leading to hormone dependent cancers and metabolic disorders. Switch to glass (Pyrex is heat and crack-resistant) and or metal containers and bottles. They retain the thermal quality of the food/drink WITHOUT chemical plasticizers and other additives. 

Avoid Chemicals in Cosmetic and Personal Care Products

Were you aware that most personal care and cosmetic products sold in the US are not regulated by the FDA and do not require safety testing of ingredients as they are ‘generally regarded as safe’? There may be dangerous chemicals lurking in your makeup and personal care product so you need to take charge of what you’re putting on your skin, hair and nails. You can go to the EWG database to look up which products are safe to use. Alternatively, you can use the Redify app to scan any product barcode and determine whether it contains toxic ingredients.

How your snoring affects your well-being – “Healthy Attitude” podcast review

Bedtime may be the favorite time of the day for thousands of people, but it does not always represent rest time for everyone. Has the snoring of your relative or partner ever kept you awake at night? Yes, it has happened to all of us. But we must be aware of a reality: in addition to causing annoying noises, snoring can be an indicator that our companions are suffering from more than just a stuffy nose.

Dr. Ana Carolina Bassol, a graduate of Mexico’s National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, knows about this firsthand. The pulmonologist works at the Galenia Hospital in Cancun, in the south of her country, and has treated dozens of cases of sleep apnea, a condition related to snoring.

This sleep disorder, known in the medical community for being underdiagnosed by professionals and neglected by patients, affects a significant number of Latin Americans in the 21st century. According to this study (in Spanish), 20% of middle-aged adults have at least mild sleep apnea and 80% of cases remain unidentified.

Dr. Bassol is aware of these figures and the possible consequences of suffering from this condition, such as heart disease. That is why she participated in the podcast “Healthy Attitude”, produced by the hospital center where she works, to inform and educate Spanish speakers about snoring and sleep apnea.

Here is a summary of her intervention in the program.

What is sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea is the total or partial blockage of the upper airway (of the respiratory system) for more than 10 seconds and sometimes even for minutes. It occurs specifically in the pharynx, a tube that connects the nostrils and the oral cavity. This duct is opened by muscle tone but can close when the tone weakens during deep sleep.

According to the doctor, there are several factors that can disrupt the passage of air through the pharynx and increase the likelihood of sleep apnea. Some of the most important are large tonsils, a long tongue, a small nose, and a small chin. She also emphasizes fat deposits, as they can cause the pharynx to collapse even when the individual is awake (due to the great weight they exert on the neck).

How do I know if I have sleep apnea?

To know if you suffer from this syndrome, you can pay attention to the intensity and frequency of your snoring when you sleep. This is one of the most frequent symptoms of the condition, as it occurs when the air causes vibration of the relaxed tissues of the throat.

Another sign that can reveal if you have this condition is the sensation of choking when you just wake up. In fact, sleep apnea can cause you to stop breathing when you sleep. But do not worry: the brain is smart and will never let you die from lack of oxygen. The organ specializes in sending a signal of stress substances (such as adrenaline) that allows you to return to a light sleep and regain the muscle tone that keeps your pharynx dilated.

What else can sleep apnea cause?

According to Bassol, the problems associated with sleep apnea are not only limited to the pharynx but can also trigger negative consequences in the circulatory system.

Whenever there is an obstruction in the upper airway, oxygen in the blood can decrease, which generates inflammatory substances that increase the formation of clots. In addition, adrenaline injections from the brain increase blood pressure, increase heart rate, and change chest pressure. These last modifications place the heart in stressful situations. This is why sleep apnea is linked to cardiac conditions such as acute heart attacks, arrhythmias, heart failure and pulmonary hypertension.

What else can I do to detect sleep apnea?

Bassol comments that the clinical manifestations of sleep apnea when the body is conscious are drowsiness, anxiety, and depression. If you are overcome with doubts and you are not sure about what you have, there are two ways to achieve an accurate diagnosis.

The first option is to take a respiratory polygraphy test. Professionals perform at your home to gather information about your oxygen saturation, your chest and abdominal movements and your airflow in the airway. To get it, they need you to sleep one night with an equipment composed of nasal prongs, a chest monitor, two elastic bands (one on the thorax and one on the abdomen) and an oximeter.

On the other hand, the second alternative is to take a polysomnography test. It is more complete than the previous one and includes an electroencephalogram, an electrocardiogram, and the measurement of other arterial gases, as well as the muscle tone. This is performed only in sleep laboratories and requires observation of the patient for an entire night. It is the best choice if you are a person with previous diseases, such as heart failure.

If you want to listen to the complete podcast (in Spanish) and learn more about sleep apnea, you can click here.

Dr. Daniel Amen Podcast Review: Memory Rescue – How to Stop Alzheimer’s & Dementia

Dr. Daniel Amen is one of the leading authorities on brain health – he is a physician, founder of Amen Clinics and BrainMD, a double board-certified psychiatrist and nine-time New York Times bestselling author.  I found this podcast easy to listen to with great tips from his Memory Rescue book (published in 2018) on how to take control of your brain.

Here are the key highlights:

  • Alzheimer’s disease is expected to quadruple in the next 35 years. What most people don’t realize is that this disease starts decades before symptoms appear. Based on imaging studies, a 59-year-old woman diagnosed with Alzheimer’s most likely had negative changes to her brain in her twenties. There is also no known cure on the horizon and it is estimated that 50% of people 85 or older will be diagnosed with it.  This may be a cause for people not wanting longevity in their life!   
  • Depression has increased by 400% since 1987 and it now affects 50 million Americans. It is also a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s.
  • Another risk factor is diabetes. A study showed that 50% of the US is either diabetic or pre-diabetic due to poor diet. Two studies have shown that as your weight goes up, the physical size and the function of your brain goes down. With 2/3 of Americans overweight, including 1/3 obese, it is the biggest brain drain in the US and now considered a national security crisis. Up to 70% of people signing up for the military are now rejected because of their weight problems. 
  • What’s important to note is that diabetes/obesity, depression and Alzheimer’s are not separate disorders but different expressions of the same unhealthy lifestyle.
  • Dr. Amen scanned his own brain at the age of 37 and noticed damage; he played football in high school, had meningitis, and poor sleep with unhealthy habits. This spurred him to develop the brain program – 20 years later, his brain scan looks like a healthy 37-year-old. 
  • Dr. Amen is a fan of brain imaging (SPECT) – his philosophy is that you need to look because imaging will show you if your brain is healthy, injured, over or under-active or has Alzheimer’s. At his Amen clinics, the first thing they do is look at your brain scans.  The imaging looks at blood flow and brain activity to get a view of how well your brain is functioning.
  • He developed a pneumonic (BRIGHT MINDS) for his Memory Rescue book and it’s as follows:
    • B is for blood flow – low blood flow is a key predictor of Alzheimer’s and anything that damages the blood vessels will damage the hippocampus. Tips: Limit caffeine and treat high blood pressure, keep your heart healthy and be physically active. Eat foods like chili peppers, beets and ginkgo biloba to increase blood flow. Brisk physical exercise is also a must as is hyperbaric oxygen therapy which can be used to increase blood flow to the brain.  
    • R is for retirement and aging – the older you get, the more serious you need to be about keeping the brain healthy. Your brain can become less active with age but with the right plan, you can slow or even reverse the aging process. Avoid factors that accelerate aging; avoid being lonely, being in a job that does not require new learning or not challenging your brain. When your brain stops learning, it starts dying. To slow aging, it’s important to be socially connected, engage in lifelong learning and stay physically and mentally active. Dr. Amen also advocates taking vitamins (multi and C) 
    • I is for Inflammation – chronic inflammation is like a low-level fire destroying your organs and this increases dementia. At his clinic, he measures the C-reactive protein (level of inflammation) and Omega-3 levels. Symptoms like joint pain, rosacea and gum disease are all indicators of inflammation which will lead to memory loss. He recommends eating more Omega-3s (oily fish), and cooking with spices like turmeric. In a new study in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the hippocampus was found to be healthier in people with the highest omega 3 levels.
    • G is for genetics – having a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer’s is a wake-up call, not a death sentence. If you think you are at risk, early screening is essential and be serious about prevention as soon as possible. Losing your memory and independence is hard and expensive. Alzheimer’s causes a build-up of toxic plaque in the brain and it’s been shown that vitamin D, blueberries, sage, turmeric and green tea can decrease plaque.
    • H is for head trauma – head injuries are a major cause of depression, addiction disorders and memory problems. A study showed that one third of people that played football had lasting brain damage. Head trauma affects the front part of the brain which affects focus and decision making. On Dr. Amen’s memory rescue program, 80% of NFL players showed improvement in blood flow, memory, attention, mood and sleep. In his podcast he shares case studies of an NFL player and a pro surfer, and their brain scans before and after the Memory Rescue program – it is quite impressive and worth a look.
    • T is for toxins and a common cause of memory loss in aging. Smoking (tobacco and marijuana), mold exposure, carbon monoxide exposure, cancer chemotherapy, radiation and heavy metals (mercury, aluminum and lead) will all lower blood flow to the brain. Lead is still found in 60% of lipstick and lead is also in airplane fuel. Dr. Amen recommends limiting exposure to toxins, buying organics and reading labels (Say NO to phthalates, parabens and aluminum). What goes on your body goes in your body and affects your brain. You need to support your organs of detoxification: kidneys – drink plenty of water;  gut – eat plenty of good fiber; liver – eat lots of brassicas (cruciferous vegetables) like broccoli, cabbage and brussels sprouts to support detoxification; skin – sweat and do saunas. A recent study has shown that people who took the most saunas had the lowest risk of memory problems.
    • M is for mental health – chronic stress, emotional trauma, grief and depression are associated with lasting memory problems. It is critical to get this treated. For example,  ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) affects 10% of the adult population. American Journal of Psychiatry studies indicated that nutraceuticals are a low-cost option that should be considered like Omega 3, saffron and SAMe (involved in the formation, activation, or breakdown of other chemicals in the body, including hormones, proteins, phospholipids, and certain drugs.) In addition, exercise, meditation, hypnosis and a vegetable-rich diet can help your overall mental health.
    • I is for immunity and infections – if you struggle with memory, infectious diseases need to be explored. Dr. Amen suggests keeping vitamin D levels optimal, taking probiotics and eating anti-viral foods like garlic.
    • N is for neurohormone deficiencies – without healthy hormones, you will be tired and foggy and your hippocampus will be smaller and weaker. A healthy testosterone for both men and women will improve mood. Optimal thyroid levels give you energy and mental clarity. The hormone DHEA helps to fight aging, and the right level and balance of estrogen and progesterone helps with blood flow. Dr. Amen suggests that you get tested annually once you reach your 40s to keep hormones strong. Avoid hormone disruptors like pesticides, BPAs, phthalates and parabens.
    • D is for diabesity which is being diabetic, overweight or both. As weight goes up, size and function of the brain goes down. Remember that the excess fat in your body is not innocuous; it disrupts hormones, stores toxins and increases inflammation. When obesity is combined with diabetes, the risk is worse as high blood sugar levels can damage your blood vessels. 
    • S is for sleep – 60 million Americans have sleep-related issues and chronic insomnia, while use of sleeping pills and sleep apnea all increase risk of memory problems. You need adequate deep sleep to provide the opportunity for the brain to clean itself – when sleep is disrupted, trash doesn’t get taken out and builds up in your brain. Dr. Amen suggests that to sleep better, make the room cooler, darker and quieter. He also advocates use of magnesium, melatonin and 5-HTP to promote better sleep.
  • Dr. Amen’s 5 diet rules for the brain: 1. Eat high-quality calories (and too many); 2. Eat clean protein at every meal to balance blood sugar; 3. Focus on healthy fats including nuts, seeds and avocados; 4. Eat smart carbs that do not raise blood sugar like those found in colorful fruits and veggies. Stay away from bread, pasta, potatoes and rice as they are pro-inflammatory; 5. Liberally use spices and seasonings like pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, turmeric, and garlic to keep the brain healthy.

Here is Dr. Amen’s podcast on Youtube:

Introduction to Mindfulness | Part 3 Short Guided Practice

with Cara Bradley

Wholistics is pleased to present Cara Bradley for a short series on the what and how of mindfulness and why training your mind to pay attention on purpose is one of the most important things you can do to feel and perform your best.

Cara has been both an entrepreneur and body-mind teacher for over three decades and is currently focused on building a “future-ready” mental wellness business. As a performance coach, she trained Fortune 500 companies, CEOs and elite college sports teams with her signature strategies to access optimal flow states. Cara is the founder of Verge Yoga Center and the author of On The Verge: Wake Up, Show Up, and Shine. https://www.carabradley.net

Introduction to Mindfulness | Part 2 Why does it matter?

with Cara Bradley

Wholistics is pleased to present Cara Bradley for a short series on the what and how of mindfulness and why training your mind to pay attention on purpose is one of the most important things you can do to feel and perform your best.

Cara has been both an entrepreneur and body-mind teacher for over three decades and is currently focused on building a “future-ready” mental wellness business. As a performance coach, she trained Fortune 500 companies, CEOs and elite college sports teams with her signature strategies to access optimal flow states. Cara is the founder of Verge Yoga Center and the author of On The Verge: Wake Up, Show Up, and Shine. https://www.carabradley.net

The Science of Yoga

I recently listened to an interesting podcast on Dr. Mark Hyman’s Broken Brain series about the science of yoga. This was a rather long podcast but it made a yoga believer out of me. Eddie Stern is a yoga teacher and author and he recently published his book, One Simple Thing: A New Look at the Science of Yoga and How It Can Transform Your Life. Yoga has been used for centuries for improving physical and mental health but how exactly does yoga do this? And how does yoga work?

Here are some of the highlights:

  • The author highlighted several studies conducted on the efficacy of yoga. One involved 68 participants and they found that sleeping diastolic blood pressure dropped by 4 points with an average drop of 7 points for both diastolic and systolic. In another study with middle school students, the yoga protocol raised grade point averages by 2.7% with 40 weeks of yoga vs. 40 weeks of a gym program. Yoga impacts the nervous system and the ability to have focused attention is dependent on the nervous system. We teach children how to tie shoelaces but not how to pay attention. Yoga works by down-regulating the sympathetic nervous system (sympathetic releases adrenaline and norepinephrine which will impair your ability to have focused attention, strategic planning) and also tones the vagus nerve.
  • What is the vagus nerve? It is the tenth and longest cranial nerve inside our body and controls many functions. The vagus nerve is 80% of the parasympathetic nervous system which is responsible for rest, digestion, repair and restoration. Also, 80% of the vagus nerves travel from our visceral organs up to the brain and deliver the message on what’s happening to the lower parts of the body. Only 20% of the vagus nerves work in the reverse direction which tells the body what to do. So that partly explains how yoga body movements and rhythmic breathing work – it sends messages to the brain that the body is being paid attention to and effectively tones the vagus nerve.
  • What is yoga’s role? According to the author, all religious traditions have had neural exercises that tone the vagus nerve which can reduce inflammation of body and mind, and decrease risk of diseases like cardiovascular, cancers, diabetes and digestive disorders. The four limbs of yoga include posture, breathing, vocalization and behavior.
    • Posture ­– proper posture and sitting straight tones the vagus nerve
    • Vocalization – chanting or breathing with sound stimulates the vagus nerve to down-regulate the sympathetic system
    • Rhythmic breathing – movements of the diaphragm send signals to the vagus nerve that everything is calm and balanced
    • Behavior – kindness, appreciation and gratitude will strengthen the vague nerve and reduce heart rate variability. Other behavior elements include honesty, not causing harm, not stealing, sexual responsibility and not coveting things we don’t have/need.
  • The context of yoga is that we can find safety in our body and nervous system to heal. We have the ability to self-regulate and self-soothe to deal with anger and frustration. Our mind and body is a continuum and there is no distinction; for example, thinking is a physical process just as movement is. There is no distinction between thought and how it affects our body. If we are depressed, it shows in our physical body – we are hunched over and our face is drawn. Our emotions and thoughts are expressed through the body. Yoga reconnects the bifurcation of body and mind by starting with the body. It starts with the brain stem to regulate breathing and to re-engage the pre-frontal cortex to bypass the sympathetic response so we can make a choice and not be controlled. Hence, through yoga, we are using our body to access the mind.
  • Our brain processes thought and movement so the way our body is moved influences our mind. When we influence our thought process, we influence our perceptions which is key when dealing with stress. Stress perceptions are not all bad – we need stress to build resiliency in our nervous system and for growth. The perception we have about stress will help us determine how we deal with the challenge vs. a struggle. Resiliency comes from addressing challenges and managing stress and this happens when there is a nice integration of flow of information between the body, the brain and the processing of the stress perception.
  • Trauma is not stored in the brain but in our body, so talk therapy is good but yoga and other modalities can help determine where the trauma is stored so one can start to work on it and build resiliency to support the nervous system.
  • What is the purpose of yoga? Yoga is about calming the fluctuations of our field of awareness. Our awareness is clouded by thoughts; we identify positive and negative thoughts and they hide us from our true self. Yoga is the process of selectively eliminating all the different movements or thoughts in the field of our awareness that are counter to who we really are.
  • Yoga addresses relaxation, moving the body, breathing, being present and practicing appreciation for the abilities we have. There are many different types of yoga but they all work. Yoga provides stress level reduction, improved concentration, better state of well-being and mind, better physical health, and more sensitivity to diet and nutrition.
  • Resonance breathing is between 5-7X per minute vs. a normal 15-18X per minute. Through resonance breathing, we are halving the cycle of respiration and through this, the heart rate variability and blood pressure all come into the same coherent pattern. This pattern resets the nervous system balance mechanism, improves heart rate variability, vagul tone and reduces inflammation. For example, when we are meditating, our breathing shifts into this resonance mode. By doing resonance breathing, we are essentially going into a meditative state without actually meditating. The resonance breathing is at 0.1Hz per minute which is the delta wave brain state that is the same as being in deep sleep without dreaming. So it’s the most restful state we can be in and we are conscious while doing it. According to the author, resonance breathing is the single most effective practice.
  • The author has a great free breathing app on the app store (The Breathing App by Eddie Stern). This app includes timers and sounds to breathe with – along with an inflating/deflating ball to match breathing rhythm. It’s awesome – try it!

If you are up to listening to a 96-minute podcast, click on the link below for more details: 

How Yoga Changes the Brain and Can Transform Your Life with Eddie Stern

Introduction to Mindfulness | Part 1 3 Steps to Getting Started

with Cara Bradley

Wholistics is pleased to present Cara Bradley for a short series on the what and how of mindfulness and why training your mind to pay attention on purpose is one of the most important things you can do to feel and perform your best.

Cara has been both an entrepreneur and body-mind teacher for over three decades and is currently focused on building a “future-ready” mental wellness business. As a performance coach, she trained Fortune 500 companies, CEOs and elite college sports teams with her signature strategies to access optimal flow states. Cara is the founder of Verge Yoga Center and the author of On The Verge: Wake Up, Show Up, and Shine. https://www.carabradley.net